Skip to content

Looking For Light Bedtime Reading? How About The Deadliest, Costliest & Most Intense US Tropical Cyclones from 1851 to 2010 – Captivating!

November 5, 2012

Many of us are still taking in the damage, destruction and humbling force of Superstorm Sandy.  This incredible weather event has created a lot of new interest in other devastating hurricanes. I heard a program on NPR about a report issued from the National Weather Service (NWS) National Hurricane Center. The title alone says it all…

The Deadliest, Costliest, and Most Intense United States Tropical Cyclones
from 1851 to 2010 (and Other Frequently Requested Hurricane Facts)

The report breaks down storms in two categories:

  • The deadliest from 1851-2010
  • The most expensive from 1900 to 2010 (monetary damages aren’t available for the earlier storms)

One fact really stands out when you look over the information: six of the 10 costliest storms occurred between 2000 and 2010 — even after adjusting for inflation.  Wow!

The report goes on to discuss that our population and our cities are much bigger today than they were 100 years ago, and our standard of living is higher. Which means that a megastorm today, can destroy much more stuff simply because there is much more stuff out there to destroy.

Given that premise, the authors went back and looked at the historical hurricanes and estimated how much damage they would be likely to do if they hit the same area in 2010. That picture looks quite different.

Happy reading!

😉

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/dcmi.shtml

http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2012/10/31/163960418/americas-most-expensive-storms?sc=nl&cc=pmb-20121031

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: